Pairfum London Roger De La Fresnaye Seated Man 1914 Perfume Bottles in Art

Perfume Bottles in Art?

Today we came across a Fragrance Flacon in the painting “Seated Man” (by Roger De La Fresnaye, 1914) and it started us wondering about ‘perfume bottles in art’.

For such a query, the internet offers a beautifully rich source of inspiration.

We encourage everybody to run this type of search and become inspired by the art you see.

Here are are a few websites that offer a good starting point:

https://arthive.com/

https://www.wikiart.org

Below we show a few of the paintings we found and liked that clearly show perfume bottles in art.

We have mixed it up with our own creations about perfume bottles.

We believe perfumery is an art in its own right and this page also includes links to Museums about Perfume.

Pairfum London Henri Matisse Woman Reading At A Dressing Table 1919 Perfume Bottles in Art

Pairfum London Perfume Candles In Art Boudoire

Pairfum London Pierre Bonnard Dressing Table 1908 Perfume Bottles in Art

Pairfum London Perfume Bottles In Art

Pairfum London The Toilet Of The Roman Ladies Juan Jimenez Perfume Bottles in Art

Pairfum London Perfume Bottles In Art Bathroom

Perfume Rainwater Pine Tree Forest Wood Ozone

Rainwater Sculpture in Pine Forest

Fragrance Rainwater Pine Tree Forest Wood Ozone

Suspended among the pine trees, is a ‘rainwater sculpture’ that looks like a chandelier.

In John Grade Studio’s “Reservoir” sculpture, 5,000 x droplets collect rainwater, with each one attached to a clear net suspended within the tree canopy.

As rainwater (or snow) collects within each droplet or evaporates again from it, the sculpture transforms itself dynamically with the changes in its weight.

Fragrance Rain Water Pine Tree Forest Wood Ozone

As a perfumery house, what intrigues us is the combination of the olfactive profiles of pine trees and rainwater in this sculpture.

  • Rainwater: watery, green, clean, slightly sulphuric,
  • Pine: a woody, resinous note with the essence of pine needle

We expect that around the sculpture will be a unique fragrance sensation reminiscent of a Fougère (Fern in English) with its interaction between:

  • a woody, earthy & green note on the one hand, and
  • watery, damp and cool freshness on the other.

Fougère / Fern is not derived or extract from a ingredient. Instead, it is an accord that endeavours to recreate the note of a green, damp forest through the combination of Lavender, Oakmoss and Coumarin. Fougère Royale by Houbigant is typically credited with being the first of this kind, which has today become a classic masculine fragrance category.

Fragrance Forest Rain Water Pine Tree Wood Ozone

Here at Pairfum London we have two wonderful fragrances in our perfume collection that are classified as Fougère or Fern:

  • SPA
  • White Lavender

Both perfumes are available in our online boutique in various Home Fragrance products:

  • reed diffusers,
  • perfumed candles,
  • fragrance room sprays,
  • linen & fabric sprays, and
  • wardrobe sachets.

Perfume Rain Water Pine Tree Forest Wood Ozone

Magnificent Magnolias Fragrance Windsor Park

Magnificent Magnolias Blooming in Windsor Great Park !

Perfumery Magnificent Magnolias Windsor Park

Magnificent Magnolias blooming in Great Windsor Park in Spring offer a spectacular sight.

The Valley Gardens, together with The Savill Garden, provide a home to a National Collection of Magnolia trees. Here are some examples:

  • On leaving the Savill building, visitors are welcomed to a fantastic show by a mature Magnolia loebneri ‘Merrill’, covered in ice-white flowers.
  • In a far corner of the garden, close to the summer house, is a Magnolia sprengeri ‘Eric Savill’, with large, bold pink flowers.
  • The Valley Gardens features a glorious collection of rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias and magnolias, best viewed in the spring from the top of the valley, with views down to Virginia Water.
Pairfum Large Reed Diffuser Bell Pure Magnolias In Bloom
Pairfum Large Reed Diffuser Bell Pure Magnolias In Bloom

About Magnolia

The magnolia family can count approx 200 species mainly found in two regions:

  • Asia, and
  • the Americas.

The Magnolia tree was named after Pierre Magnol, the French botanist behind the current nomenclature of botanical classification.

Magnificent Magnolias are significant flowers in Chinese and Japanese culture, and has been cultivated for centuries.

The ‘Magnolia Virginiana’ species (from Virginia) was the first Magnolia to be introduced into Europe. In 1687, it was sent across John Banister, an English missionary and naturalist, to Henry Compton, English bishop and a passionate gardener.

Shortly afterwards, Europe was introduced to Chinese Magnolias (Magnolia Denudata and Liliflora).

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the beautiful Star Magnolia (Stellata) from Japan was planted in Europe.

The “queen of Magnolias”, the pink Magnolia Campbellii from the Himalaya, was discovered at the beginning of the last century.

Magnificent Magnolias Windsor Park Fragrance Ingredient

Magnificent Magnolias in Perfumery

Magnolia flowers (Magnolia Grandiflora) frequently have a fragrance. Their perfume is creamy sweet with hints of citrus. Magnolia is a popular ingredient in floral perfume accords, and there have been some fragrances where Magnolia is the main floral ingredient.

Perfume Magnificent Magnolias Windsor Park

‘Magnolias in Bloom’ by PAIRFUM

Here at PAIRFUM we are proud to have captured the essence of Magnolias in our fragrance ‘magnolias in bloom’:

Fragrance Description Magnolias Bloom Ozone Melon Violet Rosewood

A spring flowers accord with the fresh top note of ozone, soft white flower petals and a hint of watery melon. The heart is complex and floral with magnolia, lily, geranium, rose and violet, while the base shines with musks and warm rosewood.

‘Magnolias in Bloom’ is available in the following luxury scented candles and natural reed diffusers:

Pairfum Natural Wax Candle Pure Magnolias In Bloom
Pairfum Natural Wax Candle Pure Magnolias In Bloom

Magnolia Photo Gallery

What Is The Scent Of Daffodils Great Windsor Park Uk

Do Daffodils have a Fragrance ?

Fragrance Of Daffodils Windsor Great Park

About Daffodils

Daffodils are considered one of the heralds of spring.

Their common name is Daffodil and their Latin, botanical name Narcissus. They are a bulb that is part of the amaryllis family, Amaryllidaceae.

Planted between September and October the previous year, the bulb develops roots before the beautiful yellow and white flowers burst out the following spring from February to early May. They can be found in borders, containers but also parks and by the roadside.

Their typical height and spread are 5cm (2in) to 50cm (20in). They prefer sun or light shade and are an easy to grow bulb. The plant is very resistant and most sorts survive cold winters to flower for many years.

The flowers are either yellow or white, trumpet or star-shaped and grow on a long stalk with green leaves. In all, there are about 26 wild varieties but many hundreds of cultivated versions.

Mainly based on their flower form, Daffodils are categorised into 13 groups, mainly based on the form of their flower:

  • Trumpet: flowers with cups (the corona) that are longer than their petals
  • Large-cupped: with large cups but the corona is not longer than their perianth segments
  • Small-cupped: the flowers have small cups, much shorter than their petals
  • Double: double blooms, with a ruffled appearance, but no clear distinction between petals and cup
  • Triandrus: small-flowered daffodils with pendent blooms, up to five, which naturalise well in grass
  • Cyclamineus: small flowers with petals sweeping back from the cup (i.e. reflexed perianth). These are an early flowering species and naturalise well in grass
  • Jonquilla and Apodanthus: These are the fragrant varieties and they display up to five small flowers per stem
  • Tazetta: another fragrant variety with up to 20 small flowers per stem, with sadly some only half hardy
  • Poeticus: another variety that can be naturalised in grass. They have small cups with a contrasting colours to their large white petals
  • Bulbocodium: in this variety the cups are much larger than the petals and they are short, with delicate, rush-like leaves. They naturalise well in grass.
  • Split-corona (Collar or Papillon): they look like orchids, with a cup split into segments. In the papillon type (typically with a whorl split into six segments) the face appears flatter and more open.
  • Species daffodils (including wild narcissi): these small species grow well in rock gardens and pots
  • Miscellaneous: daffodils that do not fit any of the above groups

Do Daffodils Have A Fragrance Windsor Park

History of Daffodils

Daffodils originate from Southern Europe and North Africa, but some varieties can be found in Asia and China. Some claim that narcissus originated from Persia and was brought to China in the 8th century by travelling traders along the Silk Route.

The flower is  linked to the Greek myth of Narcissus, who became so obsessed with his own reflection, that he knelt down to gaze into a pool of water. Sadly, he toppled into the water and drowned. The Narcissus plant sprang from where he died.

The name probably has its origin in the Greek word of ‘narke’, which became ‘narce’ under the Romans, meaning ‘numb’ and is a reference to its narcotic effect.

For more than a thousand years, Narcissus oil has been used for many different purposes, in both ancient Rome and the middle East:

  • Narcissinum was the name the Romans gave the fragrance they created using narcissus unguent.
  • In Arabia it was used in perfumery but also to cure baldness
  • In India, the oil of the narcissus (as well as fragrant oils of sandal, jasmine, and rose), is utilised during ritual cleaning before attending prayers.
  • The French used it as a scent in early cosmetics (powders, soaps and lipsticks) but they also treated epilepsy and hysteria with it
  • In China narcissus is associated with good fortune and gain. Even today, narcissus remains as a symbol of awakening and hope.

Scent Of Daffodils Windsor Great Park

Narcissus Oil

The oil was historically extracted through a technique called ‘enfleurage’, whereby the individual petals are placed on plate of lard. The fat draws the oil from the petal and after a few days the petals are replaced by fresh ones. This is repeated until the lard is saturated with oil. At this stage it is called the ‘pomade’. The pomade is then filtered and distilled to produce the oil.

Nowadays, the oil is typically extracted using volatile solvents. About 500 kg of flowers are required to produce 1 kilogram of concrete or 300 g of absolute. ‘Concrete’ and ‘Absolute’ refer to different stages of refinement of the natural extract. It explains, however, why natural narcissus oil is so precious and expensive.

Today, the major quantities of natural narcissus essential oil are produced in the Netherlands and in France.

The main varieties used for oil extraction are Narcissus poeticus, Narcissus tazetta and Narcissus jonquill.

Fragrant Varieties

Have you tried smelling a Daffodil or wondered what this wonderful member of the Narcissus family smells like?

Most hybrid and over-bred bulbs you find in some Garden Centres today (and there are several hundred cultivated varieties) will not produce a fragrance and yet there are many wild daffodil varieties (around 26) that are marvelously fragrant. This means in turn there are many different scents and yet the typical olfactive profile associated with Narcissus reads as follows:

heady floral with sweet and green nuances.

The scent of narcissus oil is strong and rich. It reminiscent of dark green leaves with traces of hyacinth and jasmine.

We have also been able to smell some varieties that were ‘spicy’ and others with ‘musky’ or ‘vanillic’ tonalities.

Narcissus would generally be classified as a ‘green-floral’, together with hyacinth and lily of the valley.

Perfume Of Daffodils Windsor Great Park

Daddodil Fields in Great Windsor Park

If you would like to experience the joys of spring, feast your eyes on an acres of daffodils in the wind and actually smell some beautiful daffodils, then head over to ‘Great Windsor Park’ (near Windsor).

The fields of yellow you will enjoy, perfectly illustrate this poem by William Wordsworth:

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host of dancing daffodils
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze

 

 

Daffodils in Home Fragrance

Here at PAIRFUM we don’t have a true Daffodil fragrance but our ‘Trail of White Petals’ contains Daffodil oil and this floral perfume has the sweet and green nuances typically associated with Narcissus. Trail of White Petals is available in perfumed candles, natural reed diffusers, perfume room sprays and many other products.

Bring the scent of spring into your home with Daffodils !

There is nothing more enjoyable than a PAIRFUM Flowerwax Candle or Reed Diffuser in ‘Trail of White Petals’, spreading the scent of spring in your home.

 

Daffodils & Narcissus in Perfumery

Here in the gallery below you can see a few perfumes where the narcissus plays a prominent role in the fragrance accord.

You will notice that we have included both classical fragrances, e.g. Nacisse Noir by Caron for women, and also modern interpretations, e.g. Eau de Narcisse Bleu by Hermès, for both women and men.

Summary

As you can see ‘Daffodils’ or ‘Narcissus’ are quite clearly fragranced and they play a prominent role in perfumery.

Sadly, through breeding many varieties we see today have lost their scent.

Should you be passing Windsor Great Park in the UK in Spring, we invite you to visit the fields full of Daffodils. It is a feast not just for your eyes but also your nose.

Windsor Great Park Daffodils Fragrance Petal Spring

Happy Earth Day Citrus Perfumery Group

Happy Earth Day

Happy Earth Day Fougere Fragrance Accord

Today, the 22nd of April, is “Earth Day” around the world and in its honour, people are sharing their passion & support for our wonderful planet with inspirational photos.

This year’s theme is “protect our species” and it is the 49th celebration of this day.

Perfumery, Nature and our Planet are intrinsically linked, which is why this day is very close to our hearts here at Pairfum London.

We would therefore invite everybody to celebrate the beauty of our planet today through your noses!

On a few occasions today, we invite you to slow down for a second and to look at what is next to you:

Take in the beauty of what you see and ‘nosy’ around to take in the scents that are close to you.

This is Earth Day through the eyes (or nose) of a Perfumer.

In this post and as one way to illustrate the close link between perfumery and our dear planet, we have linked images of individual fragrance ingredients with their olfactive groups, i.e. a visual ‘bridge’ between nature and perfume.

Here you can read more about olfactive groups.

Happy “Earth Day” from all of us here at Pairfum London.

Happy Earth Day Amber Perfumery Goup

Happy Earth Day CherryBlossom Floral Perfume

Happy Earth Day Fougere Perfumery Accord

Happy Earth Day Lavender Aromaticl Scent

Happy Earth Day Oakmoss Chypre Fragrance

Happy Earth Day Sandalwood Woody Fragrance

Happy Earth Day Strawberry Blackcurrent Scent

Happy Earth Day Vanilla Anise Oriental Scent

 

 

Flower Fragrances Of Easter Lily

What are the Top 5 Flower Fragrances of Easter

After a cold winter, barren of colour and fragrance, we all embrace the joys of Spring when Easter arrives and brings with it the smells and sights of a new season: the Flower Fragrances of Easter.

It is a time of renewal, a time to refresh and a time to start dreaming of those lazy hazy summer days that uplift our mood.

For many today, Easter is dominated by chocolate eggs and as perfumers our thoughts immediately turn toward fragrances with cocoa. However, Easter is also a time to connect with family, start planning activities and throw off the winter clothes to connect more with the outdoors and nature, which naturally leads into the scents and colours of a new season.

The sights, smells and fragrances of Easter greet us like an old friend.

Flower Fragrances Of Easter Bluebels Woodland

What are your favourite Flower Fragrances of Easter?

Below we present some of the flower fragrances of Easter that get our senses excited for Spring.  We are also sharing with you the wonderful fragrances we at Pairfum London have created to bring Spring in to your home to help you create the perfect Easter & Spring atmosphere.

We hope that the flower fragrances of Easter inspire you for the season ahead.

Flower Fragrances Of Easter White Lily

White Lily

Easter Lilies, whose scientific name is Lilium Longiflorum, are perhaps the best-known type of lily and one that we would all recognise.

Easter lilies are native to Japan. World War I soldier Louis Houghton brought Easter Lily bulbs home to share with fellow gardeners in 1919 and the popularity of the flower has grown quickly.

Lilies have held a significant place in world history because of their aroma, grace and beauty. From ancient Crete to the flower shop down the street, people always regard the lily as “the pure flower.”

There are few rivals when it comes to the stunningly beautiful fragrance of Lilies.  The exquisite perfume and wonderful flowers certainly lift spirits as we enter Spring.

Flower Fragrances Of Easter Daffodil Narcissus

Daffodil

Daffodils are considered the first heralds of Spring time.  They are also known as Narcissus and Jonquil.  Narcissus being the botanical name for this bulbous plant of the amaryllis family, Amaryllidaceae!

The stunning daffodil originates from Southern Europe and North Africa, but some varieties can be found in Asia and China.  The flower is linked to the Greek myth of Narcissus who became obsessed with his own reflection, that he knelt to gaze in to a pool of water where he toppled in to the water and drowned.  The narcissus plant sprang up where he died.

The fragrance of the daffodil is light, cool, and spring-like in its notes.  The scent is often sweet, captivating, and unique to only daffodils.  These are fragrances that have been treasured since ancient times and ones that remind us of new life and Spring.

Flower Fragrances Of Easter Crocus

Crocus

The Crocus name is derived from the Latin crocatus which means saffron yellow.  The flower has three stigmas and parts of it are often dried and used in cooking as a seasons or colour agent.  It is native to Southern Europe and Asia.  There are about 80 species of crocus and was first cultivated in Greece.

Crocuses that bloom early in spring have cheerful heads, reminding us that Spring is around the corner.  With so many varieties to choose from you can have an abundant array of colour and fragrance which is sweet and luminous.

Flower Fragrances Of Easter Tulip

Tulip

The Tulip was originally cultivated in Turkey and then imported in to Holland in the sixteenth century.  They became popular in 1592 through a book by Carolus Clusius. Indeed, they became so popular they created an economic bubble known as Tulip Mania!

The scent of Tulips cannot be mistaken.  The fragrance is fresh – fresh like the ozone!  It also has hints of floral with a base of warm honey and musk.  It is almost like nature was making perfume herself within tulips!

Flower Fragrances Of Easter Bluebell

Blue Bell

The stunningly beautiful Bluebell is another sign of Spring time with the vast spread of tiny blue flowers dazzling around parks and gardens.  This beautiful flower is a protected species in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

Also known as wood bells, fairy flowers and wild hyacinth, they have carpeted our woods, and parks for many years.  In a 2015 Spring poll by botanical charity Plantlife, bluebells were voted the favourite wild flower of England.

Unfortunately, Blue Bell’s cannot be harvested but we can still enjoy the sweet fragrance when we are out walking.  Bluebells are usually at their best during the morning time, making it a fantastic time to visit the woods or parks or when there is some sunshine allowing their scent to waft through the air.

Spring Fragrance by Pairfum London

These are just five of the fragrances of Easter which fill our homes, our gardens, and our parks.  If you would like to fill your home with the stunning fragrance of white lilies and daffodils, we at Pairfum London are delighted that our fragrance Trail of White Petals includes these stunning ingredients and is available in our range of Home Fragrances (candles, reed diffusers, room sprays, fabric sprays,…).

Choosing the right perfume for your home to herald the arrival of Spring can be difficult. So, … take the guess work out by ordering the luxury fragrance of Trail of White Petals in your favourite product from our online boutique.

Fragrance Description Trail White Petals Jasmine Tuberose Ylang

PAIRFUM Happy Easter Home Fragrance Bedroom Luxury Scented Candle Natural Reed Diffuser

How Do You Describe Fragrance

How Do You Describe Perfume?

How Do You Describe Perfume

One of the biggest challenges in perfumery is the continuous question of “How Do You Describe Perfume”.

Our noses can distinguish 1 Trillon different smells but we struggle to articulate the differences, character or nuances of a fragrance.

For this reason, the perfume industry has to a degree developed its own set of words, classification systems and various other aids to help in this task.

Here at Pairfum London we have created a brief introduction into “How Do You Describe Perfume” which we believe is ideal reading during National Fragrance Week.

After reading the article, you will feel much more comfortable with some of the terms you come across in the World of Perfumery.

How Do You Describe Scent

How Do You Describe Perfumery

Perfume Wood Green Happy St Patricks Day

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

Perfume Green Happy St Patricks Day Ireland Guide

A very Happy St. Patrick’s Day to everyone, wherever you may be in the World, from Pairfum London!

Enjoy this wonderful day of Green Celebration.

Perfume Green Happy St Patricks Day

The ‘Green’ Note in Perfumery on St. Patrick’s Day?

Is there a ‘green’ fragrance that you should wear today to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day? Read our recommendation.

In perfumery, when we refer to the term “green”, we mean notes such as ‘freshly cut grass’ or ‘crushed leaves’.

A fragrance ingredient which typifies this class is ‘galbanum’, a resin from a grass, it has a very strong green, watery and spring-like note.

Perfumers automatically associate Galbanum with ‘Vent Vert’ by Balmain, the first perfume where it dominated the note.

In recent years, another ingredient has become a popular green note: Fig leaf.

It is a synthetic ingredient, which produces the green, bitter-fruity note typical of Fig Leaf.

Demeter’s ‘Fig Leaf’ is a perfume that exemplifies this ingredient.

Another modern green note is  ‘Violet Leaf’ with its aqueous nuances.

Fresh cut cucumber comes to mind when describing this ingredient, it is used frequently in men’s notes.

‘Tomato Leaf’ is a further popular green element in today’s perfumery accords.

It has more of a herbaceous note paired with its green character.

‘Eau de Campagne’ by Sisley illustrates tomato leaf in couture perfume.

What is your perfect ‘green’ fragrance for St. Patrick’s Day?

Perfume Green Shamrock Flower Happy St Patricks Day

Perfume Green Happy St Patricks Day Cup Cake

Perfume Green Happy St Patricks Day Bouquet

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